Ihaka lectures 2018: Myth busting and apophenia in data visualisation: is what you see really there? Event as iCalendar

(Science Event Tags, Conferences, Lectures, Seminars, Department of Statistics, Computer Science, Mathematics, Physics)

07 March 2018

Venue: Large Chemistry Lecture Theatre, Ground Floor, Building 301, 23 Symonds Street, City Campus, Auckland Central

Location: Please join us for refreshments from 6pm outside the lecture theatre

Host: Department of Statistics

Cost: Free - all welcome

Website: https://www.stats.auckland.ac.nz/ihaka-lectures

Professor Dianne Cook
Professor Dianne Cook

Launching our 2018 Ihaka Lecture Series, Professor Dianne Cook (Monash University) will deliver the following lecture:

 

Myth busting and apophenia in data visualisation: Is what you see really there?

In data science, plots of data become important tools for observing patterns, discovering relationship, busting myths, making decisions, and communicating findings. But plots of data can be viewed differently by different observers, and it is easy to imagine patterns that may not exist.

This talk will describe some simple tools for helping to decide if patterns are really there, in the larger context of the problem. We will talk about two protocols, the Rorschach, which can help insulate the mind from spurious structure, and the lineup, which places the data plot in the context of nothing happening. There will be an opportunity for the audience to try out these protocols in examining data from current affairs.

Lecture commences at 6.30pm, Large Chemistry Lecture Theatre, Ground Floor, Building 301, 23 Symonds Street, City Campus, Auckland Central.

Please join us for refreshments from 6pm in the foyer area outside the lecture theatre.

 

Biography

Dianne Cook is a Fellow of the American Statistical Association, elected Ordinary Member of the R Foundation, Editor of the Journal of Computational and Graphical Statistics. Her research is in statistical graphics and exploratory data analysis. She has contributed to the development of several visualisation systems, XGobi, GGobi, numerous R packages, and explored the use of virtual environments, eye trackers, and crowd-sourcing for the purposes of visualising data.

 

Find out more information on the Ihaka Lecture Series 2018.