Ihaka lectures 2018: Making colour accessible Event as iCalendar

(Science Event Tags, Conferences, Lectures, Seminars, Department of Statistics, Computer Science, Mathematics, Physics)

14 March 2018

Venue: Large Chemistry Lecture Theatre, Ground Floor, Building 301, 23 Symonds Street, City Campus, Auckland Central

Location: Please join us for refreshments from 6pm outside the lecture theatre

Host: Department of Statistics

Cost: Free - all welcome

Website: https://www.stats.auckland.ac.nz/ihaka-lectures

Associate Professor Paul Murrell
Associate Professor Paul Murrell

In the second of the 2018 Ihaka lecture series, Associate Professor Paul Murrell (The University of Auckland) will deliver the following lecture:

 

Making colour accessible

The 'BrailleR' package for R generates text descriptions of R plots.

When combined with screen reader software, this provides information for blind and visually-impaired R users about the contents of an R plot. A minor difficulty that arises in the generation of these text descriptions involves the information about colours within a plot. As far as R is concerned, colours are described as six-digit hexadecimal strings, e.g. "#123456", but that is not very helpful for a human audience. It would be more useful to report colour names like "red" or "blue".

This talk will make a mountain out of that molehill and embark on a daring Statistical Graphics journey featuring colour spaces, high-performance computing, Te Reo, and XKCD. The only disappointment will be the ending.

Lecture commences at 6.30pm, Large Chemistry Lecture Theatre, Ground Floor, Building 301, 23 Symonds Street, City Campus, Auckland Central.

Please join us for refreshments from 6pm in the foyer area outside the lecture theatre.

 

Biography

Paul Murrell is an Associate Professor in the Department of Statistics at The University of Auckland.  He is a member of the core development team for R, with primary responsibility for the graphics system.

 

Find out more information on the Ihaka Lecture Series 2018.