Mr Blake Matthew Seers

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Data Analyst/Stats Consultant

Biography

Blake graduated with a BSc, double majoring in biological sciences and statistics in 2009, and then continued on to do his PGDipSci and Masters in statistics with application to the marine sciences. Blake was awarded the Auckland Council Student Partnership Programme external scholarship to support his masters research in modelling water quality and sedimentation until he graduated in 2011.

Upon completing his Masters, Blake worked for his supervisor Dr Nick Shears, researching the combined effects of terrestrially-derived sedimentation and climate change on turbidity in coastal waters. With the help of a scholarship, Blake started his PhD in statistics and marine science in June 2012 to investigate the likely impacts of climate change on coastal marine environments.

All of Blakes tertiary education has been completed here at the University of Auckland.

Research | Current

Investigating the effects of climate change on coastal environments.

Responsibilities

Blake is currently employed as a consultant for the Statistical Consulting Centre (SCC) within the Department of Statistics at the University of Auckland.

Areas of expertise

Experience and expertise:

  • Multivariate techniques and linear models to investigate climatic and environmental drivers of natural processes
  • Incorporating bayesian statistics to model environmental monitoring and observational data
  • Hierarchical modelling
  • Git and GitHub
  • Statistical programming
  • R package developer, author and maintainer:
    • Download and visualise NZ climate data with clifro (CRAN and GitHub)
    • Calculate wind fetch with fetchR (CRAN and GitHub)
  • Shiny app developer:

Committees/Professional groups/Services

rOpenSci

Selected publications and creative works (Research Outputs)

  • Seers, B. M. (2017). Investigating the Climatic and Oceanographic Drivers of Spatial and Temporal Variation in Coastal Turbidity and Sedimentation The University of Auckland. ResearchSpace@Auckland.
    URL: http://hdl.handle.net/2292/35831