CatchIT Graphics

Ark in the Park - Waitakere Ranges, Auckland

Movies 2010-2016

The movies show smooth versions of the catch heatmaps over time. The date cursor at the top shows the date range for each frame. The date cursor turns red in the summer months and blue in the winter months, so you can get a quick feel for how catches change over seasons.

Right-click on the movie image to save a copy to your own computer.

Rat catches 2010-2016 (2121 rats)

Stoat, Weasel, and Ferret catches 2010-2016 (623 stoats, 127 weasels, and 25 ferrets)


Rats and Stoats: side-by-side movies 2010-2016

Rats are on the left in red; Stoats, weasels, and ferrets are on the right in blue.


Rats and Stoats: focus on 2013-2015

This movie shows catches at a fine scale, month-by-month, covering 2013 to 2015 where a major rat surge occurred. Trends are harder to see at this fine scale, but the timing of surges is more precisely pinpointed. Rats are on the left in red; Stoats, weasels, and ferrets are on the right in blue.


Total Rat Catch: 2010-2016 (2121 rats)


Total Stoat, Weasel, and Ferret Catch: 2010-2016 (623 stoats, 127 weasels, and 25 ferrets)


Key to trap lines

Use the PDF version to zoom in.


Mustelid hotspots with Rat hotspots overlaid: 2010-2016

The heatmaps show relative hotspots: they don't display absolute numbers.
Hotspots for Stoats, Weasels, and Ferrets are shown in blue. Hotspots for Rats are overlaid in yellow-red over the top.


Barcharts by month: 2010-2015


Movies 2003-2016

These movies show results over time from the beginning of the Ark data in 2003. Because we have data only for catches, and not for non-catches, traps (small squares) appear on the map only when a catch was made during the corresponding timeframe.

Rat catches 2003-2016 (2878 rats)

Stoat, Weasel, and Ferret catches 2003-2016 (1078 stoats, 166 weasels, and 43 ferrets)


Rats and Stoats: side-by-side movies 2003-2016

Rats are on the left in red; Stoats, weasels, and ferrets are on the right in blue.



CatchIT is data-management software for conservation projects in New Zealand. For questions or comments, please contact Rachel Fewster.